Project Hail Mary - Andy Weir

Project Hail Mary Summary

Written By Andy Weir

Readers Score: 4.5/5
4.5
Rated by 1,604 Readers

Project Hail Mary Book Summary

Short-Summary:

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A lone astronaut must save the earth from disaster in this “propulsive” (Entertainment Weekly) new science-based thriller from the bestselling author of The Martian.

“An epic story of redemption, discovery and cool speculative sci-fi.”—USA Today

“If you loved The Martian, you’ll go crazy for Weir’s latest.”—The Washington Post


Ryland Grace is the sole survivor on a desperate, last-chance mission—and if he fails, humanity and the earth itself will perish.

Except that right now, he doesn’t know that. He can’t even remember his own name, let alone the nature of his assignment or how to complete it.

All he knows is that he’s been asleep for a very, very long time. And he’s just been awakened to find himself millions of miles from home, with nothing but two corpses for company.

His crewmates dead, his memories fuzzily returning, Ryland realizes that an impossible task now confronts him. Hurtling through space on this tiny ship, it’s up to him to puzzle out an impossible scientific mystery—and conquer an extinction-level threat to our species.

And with the clock ticking down and the nearest human being light-years away, he’s got to do it all alone.

Or does he?

An irresistible interstellar adventure as only Andy Weir could deliver, Project Hail Mary is a tale of discovery, speculation, and survival to rival The Martian—while taking us to places it never dreamed of going.

Check if available

About the book:

Project Hail Mary is a Adventure book, written By Andy Weir. As a testament to the Book's popularity, it has gathered a rating of 4.5 out of a possible 5 Stars, on Reviews by 1,604 Readers who strongly recommends this book.


You can get the book for $14.99 on Amazon or on Apple iBooks for similar price


<

Best Video Summaries of Project Hail Mary By Andy Weir

Would this be the next book you read? See What Top Readers Think!

  • Made me cry

    5
    By Cindylou Hoo
    Loved this book. Warm fuzzies at the end. Thanks to Weir for another seemingly realistic space novel.
  • Can’t wait for the movie!

    4
    By David Dorough
    I got sucked into this plot right away. Lots of twists and surprises to keep me turning those pages. Great second novel. Looking forward to number 3.
  • The magic of "The Martian" is gone

    2
    By MigMit
    This seems to be an attempt to replicate the success of "The Martian" — lone protagonist, trying to science it out. Unfortunately, big, desperate moves come very late in the novel, and, crucially, there are pretty much no personal stakes. Sure, the world is in danger — but the protagonist doesn't have family, or loved ones (Weir appears to be aware of the problem, and tried to rectify it making the main character a teacher who loves kids — but this is not properly developed), and, to top it off, he is likely in a better position than everybody else. Scientific stuff, Weir's strong suit, seems weirdly out of place here, with so many fantastic stuff (it's not just Astrofage, but also everything surrounding Eridan, xenonite, coma-resistant genes etc.) Plus there are a few very noticeable scientific mistakes (the biggest one, probably, is that Weir appears to not understand the relation between mass and energy). The whole pre-Tau Ceti story is told in flashbacks, which develops quite a lot of characters with the reader being aware that none of them ultimately matters for the main part. Overall, it's not a terrible book, but that's about it.

Comments

  • I love this book!

    5
    By unicorn_hoe
    This is the first book I’ve read in a long while. Of course I got the actual book in hand but I wanted to leave a review here. This book is amazing and if you like sci-fi then you’ll definitely love this book! The story is well written and had me excited for each chapter. In a few years I will definitely reread this book again!
  • Made me cry

    5
    By Cindylou Hoo
    Loved this book. Warm fuzzies at the end. Thanks to Weir for another seemingly realistic space novel.
  • Fun and Full of Hope (and Science Facts Galore)

    4
    By SoniColinK
    A book full of fun problems and fun solutions, grounded in rules with enough imagination to color outside their lines when needed, Project Hail Mary is brimming with passion, excitement, technobabble and hope. The protagonist’s journey is entertaining and interesting, with plenty of moments of legitimate surprise and suspense. Solving problems alongside them — sometimes faster, sometimes slower — makes the prettied-up sci-fi textbook qualities the most engaging parts of the whole book. At times, its structure saps tension from the story, robbing characters of meaningful decision making, or sometimes just obscuring that process from the readers. The most emotionally resonant parts of the book are the ones that play it straight and stick to the number, not the ones that try to lean into the broader human drama of global catastrophe. The story is numerically, measurably big, but its strongest moments come down to the small numbers and the small relationships throughout. The problems along the way can be overcome — and blowing past them is always the best part.
  • The magic of "The Martian" is gone

    2
    By MigMit
    This seems to be an attempt to replicate the success of "The Martian" — lone protagonist, trying to science it out. Unfortunately, big, desperate moves come very late in the novel, and, crucially, there are pretty much no personal stakes. Sure, the world is in danger — but the protagonist doesn't have family, or loved ones (Weir appears to be aware of the problem, and tried to rectify it making the main character a teacher who loves kids — but this is not properly developed), and, to top it off, he is likely in a better position than everybody else. Scientific stuff, Weir's strong suit, seems weirdly out of place here, with so many fantastic stuff (it's not just Astrofage, but also everything surrounding Eridan, xenonite, coma-resistant genes etc.) Plus there are a few very noticeable scientific mistakes (the biggest one, probably, is that Weir appears to not understand the relation between mass and energy). The whole pre-Tau Ceti story is told in flashbacks, which develops quite a lot of characters with the reader being aware that none of them ultimately matters for the main part. Overall, it's not a terrible book, but that's about it.
  • Wowww

    5
    By Ph77
    Sooo gooood. Just as superb as the Martian.
  • Great start, sluggish finish

    3
    By ZzzzZzz15:4
    I was drawn in by the premise and great start. But by the end, I found myself skipping paragraphs, then pages, then chapters. The story devolved into an endless refrain of unbelievable roadblocks springing from thin air for no reason. And the climax was so short and incomplete, I was angered. I’ve rarely written reviews, but this book made me feel the need to.
  • Constantly had me interested

    5
    By Whispering Onyx
    If you are even considering this book. Just get it, don’t consider anymore. It was amazing. Kept my interest the whole time and definitely left me wishing there was more. Which is always a good thing. Nor for lack of a good ending either. Just wanting to experience more of it. Trust me read it.
  • Amazing

    5
    By Nickname5161536
    Loved the story from start to finish. I wish there was a little more interaction between the crew. There were times I just skipped over the extremely science parts. Overall great though!
  • Funny and Futuristic and Believable!

    5
    By G Milillo
    Mr Grace and Rocky worked out their differences with Humor and Science! I loved this book!